Sunday, December 10, 2017

Listen to The Cloudcast

The History of The Cloudcast and the Krispy Kreme Challenge


Link to Team Cloudcast Krispy Kreme FUNDRAISER

Back in 2011, when we first started recording The Cloudcast, we thought it might be funny to pretend to have sponsors so that people might think the show was legitimate.

Keep in mind, our pitch to guests was, "We're two nobodies that don't live in Silicon Valley, and our show has no audience, but we think you're really smart and we'd like to record the discussion and put it on the Internet. So do you want to be a podcast guest?" For the kids out there, this was way before Blue Apron and Stamps.com and Tommy John Underwear were a part of your daily podcasting experience.

If you go all the way back to Episode #2, we joked that Krispy Kreme should be our first sponsor, because we had been running in the Krispy Kreme Challenge for the last couple years. Since then, it's not unusual for us to meet people in person and they know us more for "the donut race" than anything on the podcast. And to be quite honest, that's OK with us.

Before we talk about why we fundraise, it might be useful to explain "the donut run" to anyone that's new to the podcast. Here's the TL;DR version. Many years ago, a bunch of (probably drunk) fraternity dudes at NC State University (in Raleigh, NC) had a crazy idea - run 2 miles from campus to the local Krispy Kreme store, eat 12 donuts, and run 2 miles back in under an hour. Simple southern comfort food, meets the joys of the outdoors, meets the stupidity of exercise. And then throw in the costumes of Mardi Gras, and the uncertainty of the weather in the South in early February. Even ESPN has recognized it as feat of human achievement on par with the Olympics or Tour de France.

NOTE: When the race started, it was only 4 miles. Now that there are nearly 10,000 people running, they had to expand it to 5 miles to better manage the crowds. Our stomachs did not get a vote in this change.

The race has always had a charity element, with the proceeds of the entry-fees going to the NC Children's Hospital. But in 2013, they decided to allow "team donations" as a way to expand their reach. NC Children's hospital isn't a regular hospital, it's focused on the families of children with extreme situations. Their level of care for both the children and families is world class.

So in 2013, we decided to ask our community if they'd help us raise money. What happened next was beyond our wildest expectations. Donations came in from people that we had never met, from around the world, for amounts that were well beyond "nice". And the donations have kept coming in, year after year after year. In the 5 years of fundraising, The Cloudcast community has raised nearly $23,000 for those children and their families. Medical care is extremely expensive, and those donations are making a difference. It's something that everyone that has opened their wallet should be very proud of.

One of the coolest perks of the generosity of our community is that Team Cloudcast has won the "most donated" award for the last 5 years. This means that we get to stand with the organizers and present them a (literally) big check each year with all the donor's names and logos. As we get older and our brain (and knees) tell us not to run in the cold and eat all those donuts, the thought of being able to present that check each year has become the motivation for us to train prior to the race.




The Cloudcast #324 - Data Management as a Kubernetes Service

Thursday, October 12, 2017

The Cloudcast #316 - Automating to Improve Cloud Spending

Aaron and Brian talk with Jay Chapel (@parkmycloudjay, Co-Founder/CEO of ParkMyCloud) about the complexity of cloud pricing models, how IT and DevOps teams view spending differently, how to integrate monitoring and automation, and who is critical to making buying decisions in the cloud.

Show Links:

Show Notes
  • Topic 1 - Welcome to the show. Tell us about your background, why you started ParkMyCloud and how you’ve seen the market evolve since you got started (in 2015).
  • Topic 2 - ricing in the public cloud world has gotten both more complicated (e.g. no clouds do it the same way) and simpler (e.g. sustained usage discounts, free tiers, per-second billing, etc.). How do you see the market evolving, and how much of a barrier/burden is pricing “complexity” to public cloud adoption?
  • Topic 3 - You position ParkMyCloud separately for “For DevOps” and “For  IT”. How are you seeing those as two distinct use-cases or types of teams?
  • Topic 4 - ParkMyCloud not only monitors cloud costs and recommends areas for savings, but also includes automated tasks to take advantage of those optimizations. Tell us about the automation capabilities and how your customers get comfortable with that level of control in the platform.
  • Topic 5 - What are you seeing as the public cloud buying process these days? Who is involved, what criteria do they consider, and how do various stakeholders (CFO, Project Managers, Developers) continue to get cost visibility?
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